Poetry, Product, and the Novel: A Few Notes on Mark de Silva’s “Distant Visions”

Mark de Silva has written a superb polemic essay against the state of the literary novel in our time: “Distant Visions: Putdownable Prose and the State of the Art-Novel.” In it, he issues a challenge to the three-way convergence of memoir, journalism, and fiction today, which he sees as privileging easy-to-read prose and easy-to-identify-with situations, a … Continue reading Poetry, Product, and the Novel: A Few Notes on Mark de Silva’s “Distant Visions”

Dorothy Richardson, Karl Ove Knausgaard, and Literary History

Amy Shearn on how and why Karl Ove Knausgaard's champions have neglected the modernist Dorothy Richardson, whose roman-fleuve Pilgrimage anticipates My Struggle in mode and method: As much as I do love my dear prolific weirdo Knausgaard, he hasn’t really done anything all that revolutionary. In fact, exactly a century ago, England saw the beginnings … Continue reading Dorothy Richardson, Karl Ove Knausgaard, and Literary History

Notes Toward a Manifesto on Modern Fiction

Charles Finch (via): In other words, here we are: smack in the middle of the second dominant style of the novel in our century. The first, beginning in the late 1990s, produced what was sometimes called "the information novel" or, pejoratively, "hysterical realism," and its dizzy energy suited the frenzied, glossy, techy turn of the … Continue reading Notes Toward a Manifesto on Modern Fiction