Albert Murray, The Hero and the Blues

The Hero And the Blues by Albert Murray My rating: 5 of 5 stars Albert Murray is, as the fashion journalists say, having a moment. His collected non-fiction and fiction/poetry have now been canonized by the Library of America (in volumes published in 2016 and 2018, respectively) and his insights on race, American identity, music, … Continue reading Albert Murray, The Hero and the Blues

Gjertrud Schnackenberg, The Throne of Labdacus

The Throne of Labdacus: A Poem by Gjertrud Schnackenberg My rating: 4 of 5 stars In Literature and the Gods, Roberto Calasso notes that the Romantics' interest in the Greek gods was focused on the gods' own subjection to the divine law of fate: It is the immediate that escapes not only men but the … Continue reading Gjertrud Schnackenberg, The Throne of Labdacus

Northrop Frye, Anatomy of Criticism

Anatomy of Criticism by Northrop Frye My rating: 5 of 5 stars If I had to choose one book as the foundation for an education in literary criticism and theory, I might choose Anatomy of Criticism; I wish I had read it much earlier. Even if one’s goal were the deconstruction of the concept of … Continue reading Northrop Frye, Anatomy of Criticism

Charlotte Brontë, Villette

Villette by Charlotte Brontë My rating: 5 of 5 stars Villette is the thickly-written, slowly-paced, and emotionally distant first-person narrative of Lucy Snowe, a young Englishwoman who goes to work as a teacher in a boarding school in the fictional titular city, a capital of Catholic Europe that stands in for the Brussels of Charlotte … Continue reading Charlotte Brontë, Villette