François Schuiten and Benoît Peeters, Brüsel

Brüsel by François Schuiten and Benoît Peeters My rating: 3 of 5 stars This is my third visit to Franco-Belgian creators Schuiten and Peeters's Cités obscures. The series of graphic novels is currently difficult or impossible to read completely in English, as it has passed between several different publishers, leaving many of the volumes out of … Continue reading François Schuiten and Benoît Peeters, Brüsel

François Schuiten and Benoît Peeters, The Theory of the Grain of Sand

The Theory of the Grain of Sand by Benoît Peeters and François Schuiten My rating: 4 of 5 stars The Theory of the Grain of Sand (2016; originally published in 2007-2008 in France) is the 13th entry in Franco-Belgian collaborators Schuiten and Peeters's series of graphic novels, Les Cités obscures. It is the first I've read, so there is … Continue reading François Schuiten and Benoît Peeters, The Theory of the Grain of Sand

Grant Morrison and Cameron Stewart, Seaguy

Seaguy by Grant Morrison My rating: 3 of 5 stars Thanks to all my regular readers who come here in search of slightly more traditional essays on the "classics," however defined, for holding on tight through my now year-long re-reading of comic-book writer Grant Morrison. My own perhaps too hasty disparagement of Morrison in my … Continue reading Grant Morrison and Cameron Stewart, Seaguy

Alan Moore, Miracleman

Miracleman, Book Three: Olympus by Alan Moore My rating: 4 of 5 stars In the 1980s, Alan Moore, the most celebrated writer in the history of mainstream Anglophone comics, made his name by telling the same story four times. In Miracleman, V for Vendetta, Swamp Thing, and Watchmen, a commanding male figure, superior of intellect … Continue reading Alan Moore, Miracleman

Grant Morrison, Sebastian O | The Mystery Play

Sebastian O / The Mystery Play by Grant Morrison My rating: 4 of 5 stars On the one hand, the best audience for this book might be Morrison completists, those willing to hack through the wilds of the author's varied oeuvre to find rare specimens and paths not taken. The 1993 Vertigo miniseries, Sebastian O, … Continue reading Grant Morrison, Sebastian O | The Mystery Play

Grant Morrison and Chris Weston, The Filth

The Filth by Grant Morrison My rating: 4 of 5 stars The book is full of life—not like a man, but like an ant-heap. —Ludwig Wittgenstein, Culture and Value (trans. Peter Winch) Wittgenstein was a bit of a Tolstoyesque puritan in matters literary—Shakespeare was too wild and dream-like for him—so I imagine he did not … Continue reading Grant Morrison and Chris Weston, The Filth

Grant Morrison, The Invisibles

The Invisibles by Grant Morrison My rating: 4 of 5 stars This will be a pitch. You should read The Invisibles. Certainly those of you who have been reading some of the other things I write about here: not only Alan Moore, but also Herman Melville, James Joyce, Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo, and Grant's alt-universe … Continue reading Grant Morrison, The Invisibles

Moto Hagio, The Heart of Thomas

The Heart of Thomas by Moto Hagio My rating: 4 of 5 stars Consider two articles published within the last week. In one, Marie Doezema explains the role played by the philosophers of 1968, who tutored several generations of intellectuals (including my own), in legitimizing pedophilia in late-twentieth-century France: After May 1968, French intellectuals would … Continue reading Moto Hagio, The Heart of Thomas

Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, Watchmen

Watchmen: The Annotated Edition by Alan Moore My rating: 4 of 5 stars [The following essay is divided into two parts: my critical analysis of Watchmen in general, and then a review of this particular edition, a black-and-white oversized hardcover reprint with annotations by Leslie S. Klinger. If you want my assessment of this edition … Continue reading Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, Watchmen

Back to School: Literature Springs Eternal

Most of my reading matter for the spring semester is above. (You can find the syllabi here.) As with ordering from a new and affordable menu, the digestive organ may be too small for the appetite: in other words, perhaps too many books! Extracurricularly, I am currently reading a long, dense book, Saul Bellow's The Adventures … Continue reading Back to School: Literature Springs Eternal