Nathanael West, Miss Lonelyhearts and The Day of the Locust

Miss Lonelyhearts / The Day of the Locust by Nathanael West My rating: 5 of 5 stars Nathanael West's 1933 novella, Miss Lonelyhearts, has passionate defenders. Harold Bloom declares it his favorite modern novel; in his chapter on it in How to Read and Why, he notes that Flannery O'Connor's own two favorite modern novels, … Continue reading Nathanael West, Miss Lonelyhearts and The Day of the Locust

Ozick, Said, Bloom: Religion, Politics, Literature

{This is a long appendix to my review of Cynthia Ozick’s Heir to the Glimmering World. It will not make much sense unless you read that first.} 1. Ozick Against Revolution There is a paradox here in reading Jane Austen which I have been impressed by but can in no way resolve. All the evidence says … Continue reading Ozick, Said, Bloom: Religion, Politics, Literature

Hart Crane, White Buildings

White Buildings by Hart Crane My rating: 4 of 5 stars A friend of mine was once enamored of Bakhtin's Rabelais and His World; I think he found in it a literary refutation of an unsustainable idealism toward which he was then tempted—and he also thought that it illuminated the work of Guns N'Roses (on … Continue reading Hart Crane, White Buildings

Sublimity Listed: Bloom’s 12 American Writers

Harold Bloom has a new book coming out—rather like my grandmother, he's been falsely prophesying his imminent demise for almost my entire lifetime. Since the end will come for us all eventually, I'm always glad to see old Bloom fighting the good fight.* Now he lists his 12 authors who best exemplify "the American Sublime" (see the … Continue reading Sublimity Listed: Bloom’s 12 American Writers