Grant Morrison and Cameron Stewart, Seaguy

Seaguy by Grant Morrison My rating: 3 of 5 stars Thanks to all my regular readers who come here in search of slightly more traditional essays on the "classics," however defined, for holding on tight through my now year-long re-reading of comic-book writer Grant Morrison. My own perhaps too hasty disparagement of Morrison in my … Continue reading Grant Morrison and Cameron Stewart, Seaguy

Alan Moore, Miracleman

Miracleman, Book Three: Olympus by Alan Moore My rating: 4 of 5 stars In the 1980s, Alan Moore, the most celebrated writer in the history of mainstream Anglophone comics, made his name by telling the same story four times. In Miracleman, V for Vendetta, Swamp Thing, and Watchmen, a commanding male figure, superior of intellect … Continue reading Alan Moore, Miracleman

Grant Morrison, The Invisibles

The Invisibles by Grant Morrison My rating: 4 of 5 stars This will be a pitch. You should read The Invisibles. Certainly those of you who have been reading some of the other things I write about here: not only Alan Moore, but also Herman Melville, James Joyce, Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo, and Grant's alt-universe … Continue reading Grant Morrison, The Invisibles

Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, Watchmen

Watchmen: The Annotated Edition by Alan Moore My rating: 4 of 5 stars [The following essay is divided into two parts: my critical analysis of Watchmen in general, and then a review of this particular edition, a black-and-white oversized hardcover reprint with annotations by Leslie S. Klinger. If you want my assessment of this edition … Continue reading Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, Watchmen

Grant Morrison, Doom Patrol

The Doom Patrol Omnibus by Grant Morrison My rating: 3 of 5 stars In my review of Boris Groys's In the Flow, I somehow failed to note the thesis in art history for which Groys became famous: his main claim was that, as the avant-garde's dream before the Russian Revolution was the total transformation, along … Continue reading Grant Morrison, Doom Patrol